Daiquiri

daiquiri1

In the barrage of new and updated craft cocktails lining cocktail menus and bar tables, it’s easy to forget the perfection and simplicity of one of the essential cocktails, the daiquiri. If the word daiquiri invokes images of slushy, saccharine-sweet concoctions in hurricane glasses topped with paper umbrellas and fruit, and that slightly horrifies you, you can be my friend. Just kidding, no judgement here! If you happen to like that style of daiquiri, then I encourage you to read on and try the classic version, a simply mixed cocktail with three ingredients, rum, lime juice, and sugar (or simple syrup) and no frilly decorations on top. The origins of the daiquiri hail from the sun drenched shores of Cuba. Daiquri is the name of a beach near Santiago, and it is also the name of an iron mine near there. The daiquiri was supposedly created by American mining engineer Jennings Cox who was in the area during the Spanish-American War. The popularity of the drink remained localized until it was introduced to the Army and Navy Club in Washington D.C. It was one of the favorite drinks of Ernest Hemingway and J.F.K. I find with anything whether it be food or drink, if it consists of only a few ingredients, make sure to use the best ingredients you can afford. For example, if you’re making simple bruschetta, get summer-ripe heirloom tomatoes, a quality baguette, fresh, bright green basil, fresh mozzarella, sea salt and a high quality extra-virgin olive oil. In this case, use good rum as it’s the main ingredient and the star of the show. Banks 5 Island Rum is the recommendation for this recipe from the PDT Cocktail Book. It is a dry, flavorful, complex rum that is blended in the style of classic rums from the ’20s making it ideal for this daiquiri.

from: The PDT Cocktail Book
makes: 1 drink

2 ounces Banks 5 Island Blended Rum
3/4 ounce freshly-squeezed lime juice
3/4 ounce simple syrup

Shake with ice and strain into a chilled coupe. Garnish with a lime wheel or nothing at all.

daiquiri

 

 

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